Frequently asked questions

if you have more specific questions - please contact me

Frequently asked questions

1Who is a Notary Public?
A Notary Public is a qualified lawyer – a member of the third and oldest branch of the legal profession in the United Kingdom and is appointed by the Archbishop of Canterbury and is subject to regulation by the Court of Faculties. The rules which affect Notary Public’s are similar to the rules which affect Solicitors.
2What is Legalisation or an Apostille?
A notarised document may often need to be further authenticated by having the U.K. Foreign and Commonwealth Office confirm the validity of the notary's signature and seal. The requirement for this will depend on the foreign country involved. This is done by legalisation by the use of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office's official certificate attached to the document, known as an apostille. These are internationally recognised due to the Hague Convention. Occasionally foreign consulate legalisation is needed.
3What if my documents are prepared in a foreign language?
My task is to ensure you fully understand the document that you are signing.
Often documents prepared in a foreign language sometimes need translating by an official translator.
4How do I arrange an appointment?
Appointments are best made by telephone, but initial contact can be made by email if required. Appointments can be arranged to suit you, and In some circumstances I can attend you at your home or place of work.
5Identification required when seeing a Notary Public
(a) To comply with money laundering regulations a Notary must confirm your identity. When attending an appointment with a Notary each person signing the document must provide at least one of the following:
  • A valid passport
  • Driving licence with photo ID card
  • National identity card (only for EEA state members)
  • Armed forces pass (with photo and signature)
  • Firearms licence (with photo and signature)
  • Any other official government issue ID card (with photo and signature)
  • Residence permit (where relevant)
(b) and you must also provide proof of your address by one of the following:
  • Recent bank statement or letter from bank
  • Recent utility bill or council tax bill (not a mobile phone bill)
  • Tenancy agreement or Housing Association rent card for your current address
  • Inland Revenue tax demand or self assessment statement
  • Driving licence
If you are acting on behalf of a Corporation you must provide evidence of the due incorporation of the company. This can be one of the following documents:
  • Certificate of incorporation
  • Extract from the company register
  • Latest report and audited accounts
Up to date certified copy of partnership agreement - we can provide this if required.
I shall also need to verify that you are authorised to act on behalf of the undertaking you represent.